Used Funeral Cars For Sale

USED FUNERAL CARS FOR SALE – 1960 CARS FOR SALE – CLASSIC CARS FOR SALE IN ENGLAND.

Used Funeral Cars For Sale

used funeral cars for sale
    funeral cars
  • (Funeral car) A hearse is a funeral vehicle, a conveyance for the coffin from e.g. a church to a cemetery, a similar burial site, or a crematorium. In the funeral trade, they are often called funeral coaches.
    for sale
  • For Sale is a tour EP by Say Anything. It contains 3 songs from …Is a Real Boy and 2 additional b-sides that were left off the album.
  • purchasable: available for purchase; "purchasable goods"; "many houses in the area are for sale"
  • For Sale is the fifth album by German pop band Fool's Garden, released in 2000.
used funeral cars for sale – Get Low
Get Low [Blu-ray]
Get Low [Blu-ray]
Academy Award winner Robert Duvall (1983, Best Actor, Tender Mercies) is Felix Bush, the “Hermit of Caleb County,” a man so haunted by his secrets that he has lived in quiet desolation in the Tennessee backwoods for over 40 years. Realizing that he is near his own mortality, Bush decides to have a “living funeral party,” inviting people to tell their stories about him. Enlisting the help of Frank Quinn (Golden Globe winner Bill Murray, 2004, Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy, Lost in Translation) and Buddy Robinson (Lucas Black, Legion), Bush goes through a process of self-discovery, allowing him to deal with his past secrets, including ones involving old flame (and new widow) Mattie (Academy Award® winner Sissy Spacek, 1980, Best Actress, Coal Miner’s Daughter).

Comedies about death aren’t exactly a novel proposition, but Get Low, which draws from a real 1930s incident, leaves the gallows humor behind for a lighter touch. After losing the love of his life 40 year before, Felix Bush (Robert Duvall) has lived like a hermit ever since. With death on the horizon and guilt weighing him down, the “crazy ol’ nutter” decides to go out with a party. As he tells funeral director Frank Quinn (Bill Murray in top form), “Time for me to get low.” Frank and his assistant, Buddy (Duvall’s Sling Blade costar Lucas Black), find the request bizarre–since Felix plans to attend–but they can’t afford to turn him down. Quips Quinn, “One thing about Chicago, people know how to die. People are dying in bunches, but not around here.” So, they fit Felix for a suit, post invitations up around Caleb County, and set up a land raffle to encourage everyone to show. Before he leaves this mortal coil, Felix longs to hear the tall tales the town folk have been spreading about him. While preparing for the big day, he reconnects with Charlie (Bill Cobbs), a preacher, and Mattie (Sissy Spacek), an old flame who returned to the county after her husband’s death. Their encounters, which have a gentle sweetness, encourage Felix to share the truth he’s kept bottled up inside for decades. After that big buildup, his confession feels a little anticlimactic, but cinematographer-turned-director Aaron Schneider’s affection for his characters always shines through. –Kathleen C. Fennessy

80% (14)

John B. & Isabella Leech House
John B. & Isabella Leech House
520 West End Avenue, Upper West Side, Manhattan

The residence at 520 West End Avenue, commissioned by developer Richard G. Piatt in 1892 and completed that same year for cotton broker John B. Leech and his wife Isabella, is an early, and within the context of his career, an unusual work of architect Clarence F. True. A seminal figure in establishing the initial architectural character of the Upper West Side, True was particularly active in the development and design of rowhouses and town houses in the area west of Broadway during the years 1890 to 1901. The Leech residence, originally a large single-family town house, was built during the first period of development of West End Avenue, when it was lined with distinguished residences for prosperous New Yorkers. In the bold form of its rusticated sandstone base, the complex massing of its tan Roman ironspot brick upper stories (now painted), the subtle handling and richness of its carved stone details of Romanesque, Gothic, and Elizabethan derivation, and decorative wrought-ironwork, it is a fine example of the diverse picturesque, eclectic architecture of the late 19th century which once characterized West End Avenue as one of New York City’s most desirable residential avenues. Its corner site, allowing for two principal designed facades linked by a curved corner bay, both enhances the prominence and integrity of its original architectural elements and emphasizes its status as one of the most significant surviving individually-designed large town houses on the Upper West Side.

Development of the Upper West side

The Upper West Side, including West End Avenue, remained largely undeveloped until the 1880s. The area, once known as Bloomingdale ("Bloemendael," named by Dutch settlers), was included in the Randel Survey (Commissioners Map) of 1811 which. planned a uniform grid of broad avenues and narrow cross streets upon the rolling hills of Manhattan as far north as 155th Street. Years elapsed, however, before streets on the Upper West Side were actually laid out.

At mid-century, as New York City grew rapidly northward, residential development was concentrated primarily on the East Side, following the march uptown of New York’s wealthy citizens and transit lines. Central Park, designed in 1857, was not oily an amenity for all the citizens of New York, but was as well a major spur to development of the city northward. A number of additional civic improvements also greatly contributed to the eventual development of the Upper West Side. The Eighth Avenue horse car line was extended to 84th Street in 1864. (Previously the only transit facility was a stage line along Bloomingdale Road.) The Commissioners of Central Park were authorized to complete the laying out of streets west of Central Park in 1865. West End Avenue (formerly Eleventh Avenue) was opened in 1880, from 72nd Street to 106th Street. Bloomingdale Road (renamed the Boulevard) was widened to 1868-71 and received central planted malls from 59th to 155th Streets.

The biggest boost to development of the area west of Broadway was the creation of Riverside Kirk and Drive near the Hudson River. Construction on the Upper West Side was further stimulated by the completion of the Ninth Avenue Elevated in 1879.

Developers had been reluctant at first to build on the Upper West Side, after a wave of speculation following the Civil War and subsequent period of stagnation from the Panic of 1873. Although Central Park West and Riverside Drive were envisioned as residential avenues for the wealthy, on a par with Fifth Avenue, there was no agreement about the future character of the rest of the Upper West Side. High real estate prices and delays in civic improvements further discouraged investment. Edward Clark, president of the Singer Sewing Machine Co., was the first to make major investments on the Upper West Side (1877-85); the Dakota, New York’s first luxury apartment house, and his rowhouses on West 73rd Street, attracted much attention to the Upper West Side.

By 1885 the Upper West Side emerged as the city’s area of most intense speculation. Developers already at work there undertook new and larger projects and were joined by nearly all of the larger builders in the city. Buildings erected on the Upper West Side now sold readily. In 1886, the Times wrote: "The west side of the city presents just now a scene of building activity such as was never before witnessed in that section . . . thousands of carpenters and masons are engaged in rearing substantial buildings … 1,5 Development first occurred more rapidly on the streets between the Boulevard and Central Park than on the streets to the west of the Boulevard due, undoubtedly, to two factors: the land west of the Boulevard was less accessible to transportation, and lots along Riverside Drive, and to seme degree, West End Avenue, were (like Central Park West) considered to be prime property.

The notion that New York’s social elite would e

John B. & Isabella Leech House
John B. & Isabella Leech House
Upper West Side, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

The residence at 520 West End Avenue, commissioned by developer Richard G. Piatt in 1892 and completed that same year for cotton broker John B. Leech and his wife Isabella, is an early, and within the context of his career, an unusual work of architect Clarence F. True. A seminal figure in establishing the initial architectural character of the Upper West Side, True was particularly active in the development and design of rowhouses and town houses in the area west of Broadway during the years 1890 to 1901. The Leech residence, originally a large single-family town house, was built during the first period of development of West End Avenue, when it was lined with distinguished residences for prosperous New Yorkers. In the bold form of its rusticated sandstone base, the complex massing of its tan Roman ironspot brick upper stories (now painted), the subtle handling and richness of its carved stone details of Romanesque, Gothic, and Elizabethan derivation, and decorative wrought-ironwork, it is a fine example of the diverse picturesque, eclectic architecture of the late 19th century which once characterized West End Avenue as one of New York City’s most desirable residential avenues. Its corner site, allowing for two principal designed facades linked by a curved corner bay, both enhances the prominence and integrity of its original architectural elements and emphasizes its status as one of the most significant surviving individually-designed large town houses on the Upper West Side.

Development of the Upper West side

The Upper West Side, including West End Avenue, remained largely undeveloped until the 1880s. The area, once known as Bloomingdale ("Bloemendael," named by Dutch settlers), was included in the Randel Survey (Commissioners Map) of 1811 which. planned a uniform grid of broad avenues and narrow cross streets upon the rolling hills of Manhattan as far north as 155th Street. Years elapsed, however, before streets on the Upper West Side were actually laid out.

At mid-century, as New York City grew rapidly northward, residential development was concentrated primarily on the East Side, following the march uptown of New York’s wealthy citizens and transit lines. Central Park, designed in 1857, was not oily an amenity for all the citizens of New York, but was as well a major spur to development of the city northward. A number of additional civic improvements also greatly contributed to the eventual development of the Upper West Side. The Eighth Avenue horse car line was extended to 84th Street in 1864. (Previously the only transit facility was a stage line along Bloomingdale Road.) The Commissioners of Central Park were authorized to complete the laying out of streets west of Central Park in 1865. West End Avenue (formerly Eleventh Avenue) was opened in 1880, from 72nd Street to 106th Street. Bloomingdale Road (renamed the Boulevard) was widened to 1868-71 and received central planted malls from 59th to 155th Streets.

The biggest boost to development of the area west of Broadway was the creation of Riverside Kirk and Drive near the Hudson River. Construction on the Upper West Side was further stimulated by the completion of the Ninth Avenue Elevated in 1879.

Developers had been reluctant at first to build on the Upper West Side, after a wave of speculation following the Civil War and subsequent period of stagnation from the Panic of 1873. Although Central Park West and Riverside Drive were envisioned as residential avenues for the wealthy, on a par with Fifth Avenue, there was no agreement about the future character of the rest of the Upper West Side. High real estate prices and delays in civic improvements further discouraged investment. Edward Clark, president of the Singer Sewing Machine Co., was the first to make major investments on the Upper West Side (1877-85); the Dakota, New York’s first luxury apartment house, and his rowhouses on West 73rd Street, attracted much attention to the Upper West Side.

By 1885 the Upper West Side emerged as the city’s area of most intense speculation. Developers already at work there undertook new and larger projects and were joined by nearly all of the larger builders in the city. Buildings erected on the Upper West Side now sold readily. In 1886, the Times wrote: "The west side of the city presents just now a scene of building activity such as was never before witnessed in that section . . . thousands of carpenters and masons are engaged in rearing substantial buildings … 1,5 Development first occurred more rapidly on the streets between the Boulevard and Central Park than on the streets to the west of the Boulevard due, undoubtedly, to two factors: the land west of the Boulevard was less accessible to transportation, and lots along Riverside Drive, and to seme degree, West End Avenue, were (like Central Park West) considered to be prime property.

The notion that New York’s s

used funeral cars for sale
used funeral cars for sale
Photo Reprint Funeral cars nos. 1-12
The Popular Graphic Arts Collection is a large collection of historical prints (ca. 1700-1900) created to document geographic locations or popular subjects and sometimes used for advertising and educational purposes. Most are by American printmakers (e.g., Baillie, Currier & Ives, Sachse & Co.), but publishers in many other countries are also represented (e.g., Antonio Vanegas Arroyo). Subjects vary widely, from city and harbor views, street scenes, and manufacturing plants to genre scenes, historical events, religious iconography and portraits. This collection includes some images that reflect popular racism and stereotypes of their era. Photo Reprint Funeral cars nos. 1-12 . Reprint is 24 in. x 18 in. on archival quality photo paper.

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